5 Questions To Ask Your Managers Every Month To Help Them Grow as a Leader

How can you trust your managers to do the job while you’re still responsible for it?

Vinita

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When you stop managing individual contributors and start managing other managers, a lot needs to change. Your role is no longer about assigning tasks, meeting deadlines or taking care of your team’s work assignments and other responsibilities. Your managers are now doing the work you used to do yourself. So, how can you let go of the control? How can you trust them to do the job while you’re still responsible for it? Ask these 5 questions to your managers every month.
Credit: Author

When you stop managing individual contributors and start managing other managers, a lot needs to change. Your role is no longer about assigning tasks, meeting deadlines, or taking care of your team’s work assignments and other responsibilities. Your managers are now doing the work you used to do yourself.

You can’t do their work.

You can’t make their decisions for them.

You can’t be involved in day-to-day priorities.

So, how can you let go of the control? How can you trust them to do the job while you’re still responsible for it?

You need to invest in their growth. You need to give them full ownership while holding them accountable to take their job seriously. However, most leaders get this wrong. They’re either:

  • Too involved: Being too involved in day-to-day decisions not only impacts your effectiveness as a leader but also leaves less room for your manager to learn and grow.
  • Too disconnected: You may fail to see when they’re struggling. Every missed opportunity to coach and guide them diminishes their potential.

To turn your managers into successful leaders, don’t be too involved or too disconnected. Find the sweet spot where you know just enough to coach when needed while giving them the space to explore, work things out on their own, and learn from their mistakes.

The temptation to lead as a chess master, controlling each move of the organization, must give way to an approach as a gardener, enabling rather than directing. A gardening approach to leadership is anything but passive. The leader acts as an “Eyes-On, Hands-Off” enabler who creates and maintains an ecosystem in which the organization operates. ―Stanley McChrystal, Team of Teams

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Vinita

Author: Books on Mindset, Imposter Syndrome. Scaling products → Scaling thinking (⊙_⊙) Former AVP Engineering, Swiggy. I write about work, progress and success.