What Gets in the Way of Clear Thinking?

5 factors that have the ability to overpower and completely color your thinking.

Vinita

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Credit: Author

Our thoughts aren’t clear most of the time. Instead of a clear blue sky, they often appear as dark clouds and storms in the sky.

While some people are able to look beyond this temporary darkness into the hidden bright blue sky, others get bogged down by it and feel trapped, unable to think and act clearly.

Clear thinking is a point of leverage — it helps you make better decisions and avoid deadly mistakes with far-reaching consequences. Many forces — some within our control and others outside it — delude our thinking and judgment. Learning to recognize these forces and playing them to our advantage instead of letting them deceive us is a valuable skill to build in life.

Like a diamond, the more clarity we have, the more value we bring— Ruth Saw

But thinking clearly isn’t something you can achieve in a day. Building mastery in it is an iterative process because the things that get in the way of clear thinking never really go away. You only get better at catching errors in your thinking and applying the right strategies to remove brain fog that gets in the way of clear thinking.

Here are the 5 factors that have the ability to overpower and completely color your thinking:

Executing default behavior instead of taking control

We sometimes make conscious decisions. But most of the time our brain makes the decision for us.

When we pass control and let our brain decide what to do in certain situations, it can make a good decision or turn a bad situation into worse.

We may overreact when someone disagrees with us.

We may get angry and lash out at someone.

We may judge and stamp others.

When we fail to control our impulses and react to our circumstances instead of acting consciously, instead of making forward progress, we take a step backward.

We not only do not achieve the outcomes we desire, we waste a significant amount…

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Vinita

Author: Books on Mindset, Imposter Syndrome. Scaling products → Scaling thinking (⊙_⊙) Former AVP Engineering, Swiggy. I write about work, progress and success.